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US$15.08m grant to AMF from Good Ventures


We are absolutely thrilled to have recently been awarded a US$15.08m grant by Good Ventures, the San Francisco based philanthropic foundation.

Enabling larger scale distributions

This is the fifth grant AMF has received from Good Ventures over the last six years and will again be fundamental to our ability to support larger scale distributions.

This grant comes at an exciting time for AMF as we work to build the number of projects we support that are of multiple millions of nets at a time, including helping countries close net gaps so that entire populations are protected.

Every single donation is important, no matter how large, in the fight against malaria.

There is a huge gap between the funding available and the net need. We never forget that every $2.50 buys a net and protects two people when they sleep at night, potentially from the bite of a malaria-carrying mosquito.

There are now over 206,000 donations to AMF. Together we have built a community that will keep the fight against malaria high on the international agenda. Projects we are currently considering require a further US$100m. Aside the occasional marvellous large donation, the overwhelming number of AMF’s donations are from donors giving less than US$200 and we are incredibly grateful for every one of them.


US$100 million milestone!


We have just passed US$100 million raised since AMF started 12 years ago! Thank you!

This has been a 'grass roots' achievement by many people - 205,795 donations from 80,789 people in 181 countries and with no money from governments.

The last few years has seen donations increase significantly with the last three annual totals being US$4.0m, US$14.2m and US$49.1m.

The most important two numbers are of course for those we can prevent from dying and falling sick from malaria.

Whilst we can only estimate these mortality and morbidity numbers, we can be more precise about the numbers of nets able to be funded and people protected.

  • Deaths averted: 48,000 (est)
  • Malaria cases averted: 48,000,000 (est)
  • Nets funded: 36,000,000
  • People protected: 64,800,000
  • Nights of protected sleep: 53,217,000,000 (53 billion)

Assumptions

  1. The number of nets able to be funded with the US$100m AMF has received is 36 million
  2. Every 750 nets equates to one death averted
  3. Every 750 nets leads to 1,000 cases of malaria being prevented
  4. A net lasts 2.25 years and protects on average 1.8 people

It is important to point out that these numbers apply when all US$100m has been spent on nets and they are in place. This is not the case currently as some nets will only be distributed in the next six months and some funds are still to be allocated to distributions. The figures give an idea of what US$100m can achieve.


AMF - Behind the scenes


This blog post was first published in July 2014, but is relevant today and we have reposted it as it may be of interest to more recent donors.

We have added Behind the Scenes to the Transparency section of the site.
 
We show this information to be transparent but also for those who might be interested in some of the things that go on behind the scenes in managing the charity.

Many of AMF's systems are automated. This means many activities are handled very efficiently requiring only a few minutes of oversight each month. Importantly, it also means we are able to do things we would otherwise not be able to do because they now require minimal resources. 
 

Topics we have covered, many of which include live data, are:

  1. Allocating donations to distributions
  2. Reporting on Post-Distribution Check-Ups (PCDUs)
  3. Managing Gift Aid
  4. Converting and locking all donations in US$
  5. Sending personal thank yous to donors
  6. Monitoring new donations 

Update on potential future distributions and funding gaps - Dec 2016


The global gap in funding for nets and non-net costs over the next three years is estimated to be US$500m or 100 million nets.

That equates to tens of millions of nets per year. Globally, if we can find the funds, we can ensure 180 million people will be protected from malaria.

For our part, we are in discussions with a number of countries about their funding needs which range from 3m to 25 million nets.

  • 3m LLINs to protect 5.4m people, for distribution in 2017
  • Up to 10m LLINs, 18m people, 2018
  • Up to 15m LLINs, 27m people, 2018
  • Up to 25m LLINs, 45m people, 2019

We are in close contact with other funders who will fill some or all of the funding for individual countries. In particular, the Global Fund will shortly announce its allocation of funding for countries for the period 2018-2020 from its three-year replenishment cycle. Note: US$500m is the estimated funding gap after the Global Fund has made its funding allocation.

The distributions we are discussing are for 2018 and 2019 as commitments need to be in place two years ahead of nets being distributed for countries to properly plan whole-country universal coverage campaigns. These campaigns are significant logistical operations.

There may also be net gaps for distributions in late 2017 that become apparent in the first part of 2017. Those net gaps would require quick action, and uncommitted funds in hand, to be filled.

AMF's gap for more funding remains very large and we agree with GiveWell's assessment that it is between US$80m and US$200m for the coming year.

We continue to focus on raising funds to maximize what we are able to contribute. Each additional donation increases the quantity of nets to which we can commit, so we are very grateful for every single donation.

Future distributions page


200,000th donation and 4 x US$1m!


These numbers illustrate AMF's two equally important categories of donation and our progress.

Majority donors

Most donations range from a few dollars (and £, €, CAN$, NZ$, AUS$ etc) to many thousands. In the most recent financial year we received 51,882 donations totaling US$49.1m (up from $14.1m the previous year) and we are thrilled to have just received our 200,000th donation!

We are really pleased there are donors in so many countries, 182, contributing together to the fight against malaria.

Major donors

A few of the donations we receive are for hundreds of thousands of dollars or more. We are delighted to have received news of four donations, each for US$1m, from donors who visited two of our projects in Africa. Together, they will allow us to buy another two million nets to protect 3.6 million people.

Both groups of donors are important to AMF's work. Without the combined power of the majority donors, our bedrock support, we could not fund the millions of nets we do. Without the major donors, we would not be able to increase significantly the quantity of nets we fund.

We are so grateful for your support. Thank you.


The Life You Can Save rates AMF a top charity for 2017, the sixth year running!


The Life You Can Save (TLYCS) has updated its list of recommended charities and we are delighted to be ranked as a top charity for the sixth year running.

TLYCS highlight in their review 'Why AMF is effective':

  • Designed for long-term impact
  • Proven results
  • Effective monitoring and evaluation
  • Economically beneficial
  • Cost-effective
  • Efficient
  • Exceptionally low overheads

Over the last year TLYCS has influenced* over 6,600 donations to AMF from 1,582 donors in 68 countries totalling US$3.61 million, including almost 20% of the recurring donations made to AMF. We are immensely grateful for this confidence and support.

* For those donors who told us TLYCS influenced their donation.

More: The Life You Can Save


How Humans Made Malaria So Deadly - video by MinuteEarth


MinuteEarth have produced a neat video about malaria, 'How Humans Made Malaria So Deadly' (2mins 40s). Who knew 'agriculture' was the bad guy? Please do take a look.


GiveWell ranks AMF #1 for fifth time in six years!


GiveWell has updated its top charity list and we are delighted to again be included as a top-rated charity, ranked #1. This is now the fifth time in six years AMF has been rated and ranked in this way.

"The Against Malaria Foundation (AMF) is one of our top-rated charities, and an organization that we feel offers donors an outstanding opportunity to accomplish good with their donations."

GiveWell conducts extensive research with a particularly high level of rigour and analysis and to date has spent hundreds of hours investigating AMF and our work including two distribution site visits to Africa.

Over the last year GiveWell has influenced* over 28,190 donations to AMF from 9,484 donors in 82 countries totalling US$36million, including almost 40% of the recurring donations made to AMF. We are immensely grateful for this confidence and support.

* For those donors who told us GiveWell influenced their donation.

More: GiveWell homepage, Top charities blogpost, Review of AMF


AMF funds 2.8 million nets for distribution in Papua New Guinea in 2017 and 2018


AMF has signed an agreement with partners in Papua New Guinea to fund 1.2 million nets for distribution in 2017 and has committed to fund 1.6 million nets to be distributed in 2018. This represents 100% of PNG’s long-lasting insecticide treated net (LLIN) need for 2017 and 2018.

The nets will be distributed via a rolling universal coverage campaign – one third of the country is covered each year, which optimizes the teams and other resources used to carry out the distributions and is designed to suit the challenging and widespread PNG geography.

The 2017 nets will be distributed between March and December 2017.

In total, 5.6 million people will be protected. Malaria is one of the primary health issues in PNG, with high incidence levels seen across the country. These nets have the potential to play a major part in reducing deaths and illness.

AMF allocates individual donations to specific distributions and so far we have allocated 3,427 individual donations from 1,321 donors from 35 countries. These figures will increase as further donations are allocated. Many donations, large and small, help fund these nets.

Our distribution partner in PNG, The Rotary Club of Port Moresby (RCPM) has demonstrated a strong attitude to accountability and this is reflected in our agreement. RCPM has been responsible for carrying out the universal coverage distributions in PNG for the last five years. We are grateful to the RCPM for the open, efficient and transparent nature of our discussions. We will report openly on progress and performance throughout the distribution.

Key elements of our agreement include:

  • AMF is funding 1,159,400 LLINs for distribution in 2017 and 1.6m LLINs for distribution in 2018
  • This is a co-funding partnership with non-net costs (shipping, pre-distribution, distribution) funded by the Global Fund
  • '105%' data collection will be used for the pre-distribution household-level registration process to support accurate data gathering.
  • Household-level data will be put in electronic form using AMF’s Data Entry System (DES). This, and the above element combined, are the basis for a highly accountable distribution.
  • Post-distribution check-ups of net use and condition (PDCUs) will take place every six months for two and a half years in all districts. AMF will fund this.

Note: We have signed the agreement for the nets to be distributed in 2017. We have not signed the agreement for the 2018 nets as this will take place in the first part of next year when other partners receive formal notification of the relevant funds allocation.

More information


US$90m milestone passed!


We have now reached US$90 million raised - thanks to a donation from Amstelveen in the Netherlands!

We have also recently passed 183,000 donations! As always, our sincere thanks to everyone for their support and generosity.

You can see all of our previous milestones on our milestone page.


AMF funds 2.4 million nets for distribution in Togo in 2017


AMF has signed an agreement with Togo's Ministry of Health to fund 2.4 million long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) for distribution in Togo's upcoming universal coverage campaign (UCC).

The nets will cover the entire population in 4 out of the 5 regions in Togo: Savanes, Kara, Centrale and Plateaux. The current schedule is for this to take place in July and August 2017. The nets will be ordered shortly to be manufactured and shipped to meet this timeline.

These nets will protect 4.3 million people. Malaria is one of the primary health issues in Togo, with high incidence levels seen across the country. These nets have the potential to play a major part in reducing deaths and illness.

AMF allocates individual donations to specific distributions and so far we have allocated 3,881 individual donations from 1,517 donors from 31 countries. These figures will increase as further donations are allocated. Many donations, large and small, help fund these nets.

The National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) has demonstrated a strong attitude to accountability and this is reflected in our agreement. We are grateful to the NMCP for the open, efficient and transparent nature of our discussions. We will report openly on progress and performance throughout the distribution.

Key elements of our agreement include:

  • AMF is funding 2,413,250 LLINs
  • Non net costs (shipping, pre-distribution, distribution) funded by the Togo Government/partners
  • '105%' data collection will be used for the pre-distribution household-level registration process to support accurate data gathering.
  • Household-level data will be put in electronic form. This, and the above element combined, are the basis for a highly accountable distribution.
  • Post-distribution check-ups of net use and condition (PDCUs) will take place every six months for two and a half years in all 29 districts. AMF will fund this.

More information


Update on potential future distributions and funding gaps


We are currently discussing funding for four net distributions that require nets in early to mid-2017.

We are in a position to discuss these distributions as a result of the many individual donations that have allowed us to ring-fence US$24.9m and enter discussions with the relevant National Malaria Control Programmes with, necessarily, funds in hand to honour agreements reached.

Thanks to this support, AMF has been able to take an important step forward and discuss, at the same time, a series of multi-million net distributions with the prospect of protecting large numbers of people.

The total quantity of nets required is 13.9 million to protect in total 25 million people, all in countries in Africa.

  • 5.2m LLINs to protect 9.4m people, for distribution in July-August 2017
  • 4.6m LLINs to protect 8.3m people, for distribution in July-October 2017
  • 3.0m LLINs to protect 5.4m people, for distribution in March-May 2017
  • 1.1m LLINs to protect 2.0m people, for distribution in July 2017

The total required to fully fund these distributions is US$34.6m, US$9.4m more than we currently have available. We will assess our total funds available in the coming weeks and will either decline funding of one or more distributions or scale back funding for a number of them.

We continue to focus on raising funds to maximize what we are able to contribute. Each additional donation increases the quantity of nets to which we can commit, so every donation matters.

We are also discussing a number of net distributions scheduled for 2018 for which the funding requirement would be a further US$65-95m and we are actively seeking support for these opportunities. In each case, the relevant countries have started discussions to identify funding sources and we hope we will be able to play a part in those discussions.

Further details for these potential distributions


Accountability and transparency elements in recently agreed distributions


In two recently agreed distributions we have seen developments that are very positive and that will help in achieving high levels of accountability and understanding of how these net distributions perform.

In the last six months we have signed agreements funding 2.7 million nets for distribution in Ghana (Apr to Jul 2016) and 10.7 million nets for Uganda (Oct 2016 to May 2017). We are pleased to say that several standard operational aspects of AMF-funded distributions, that improve accountability, are being adopted in these distributions and for the first time in the two countries.

In Uganda, household net-need information will be gathered using a '105% data collection' approach whereby a second set of data collectors, with no knowledge of previously collected data, visit 5% of the households already visited by the main data collectors. The 5% data overlap is compared to give an indication of data integrity. Both sets of data collectors are aware of this independent data-checking mechanism and this helps to ensure data is collected accurately. The Uganda NMCP has decided to implement this approach country-wide (i.e. in all four regions) and not just in the two regions in which AMF-funded nets are being distributed.

In Ghana, in the three regions for which AMF is funding nets, household-level data (including the name of the head of household, number of people in the household, number of nets needed) that is collected on paper, is being put in electronic form (into a database) by data entry clerks thereby giving easy access for all partners to the complete set of data for the numbers and locations of nets distributed.


Accounts for FY to 30 June 2016 (unaudited) now available


Our Financial Year ended yesterday at midnight and, as part of our commitment to efficiency, our annual accounts have been generated and are available to view on our Easier-to-understand accounts page.

We are able to show our pre-audit numbers within a few hours of the end of our financial year due to the level of automation of our financial systems which brings a number of benefits:

  1. Accurate management information - On any aspect of our finances at any time
  2. Improved transparency - For management, governance and audit purposes
  3. Improved efficiency - Minimal administrative input to prepare the accounts at year end (data is entered most working days during the year)
  4. Swift production of our annual accounts - Within 24 hrs of FY end i.e. once the closing balances on our accounts are known the next day
  5. Assisting our auditors - Swift availability of our draft annual accounts to give our auditors maximum flexibility in scheduling their work
  6. Keeping stakeholders up to date – Providing donors, trustees and other stakeholders with timely information on our financial status and performance

A further benefit is we now have real-time financials in our ‘Easier-to-Understand’ section of our financial information.


We now show the nets funded and people covered per individual donation


We allocate each donation to a specific net distribution as part of our desire to be highly transparent and accountable with each donation we receive. Donors can follow where the nets they fund are distributed.

We now show, for each donation, the specific number of nets funded and an estimate of the number of people covered.

  • Nets funded: We can be precise about the number of nets bought because the nets for each distribution, and indeed for each location within it, have a specific cost. The cost typically ranges from US$2 to US$3 as there can be a different mix of nets chosen (net type, size and brand) for a particular location within a distribution.
     
  • People covered: The estimate of the number of people protected is the number of nets multiplied by 1.8. This is the ratio usually seen in a large scale distribution.

If a donation has not yet been allocated to a distribution, we use the current average cost of a net to estimate the number of nets the donation will fund.

Columns for the number of nets and people covered are shown on public pages listing donations (e.g. list of all donors and sponsors, fundraising pages) and on private pages (personal donations pages).


West Kasaï, DRC: 18-months post-distribution check-up data collection


The data collection phase of the 18-months post-distribution net use check-up (PDCU) in West Kasaï is underway.

  • Smartphones are again being used for data collection and to show instructional videos as necessary
  • Building on the 6 and 12 month surveys an improved data collection form has been implemented
  • 12,800 households (5% sample) selected at random being visited unannounced across 578 villages in 8 health zones
  • The data collection phase will take place from 6th June to 25th June 2016

The PDCU gives all relevant parties data about net hang up and net condition and can contribute to ongoing malaria control decisions. There are now indications that the use of smartphones in data collection brings cost efficiencies and other benefits. We will report more fully on this in the months ahead.

Further information on the distribution


Dowa District, Malawi: 12-months post-distribution check-up data entry


The data collection phase of the 12-months post-distribution net use check-up (PDCU) in Dowa District, Malawi, is now complete. Five percent of households, randomly selected, across 33 health centre areas in the district are being visited, unannounced, to assess net use and condition.

The data are now being entered in Malawi and may be viewed as they are entered. As soon as all data have been entered we will publish a summary of the results.

The specific nature of the data - at the health centre level - means the District Health Officer (DHO), health centre leaders, community leaders and other health workers are able to decide what targeted malaria control intervention might be appropriate in specific areas. In circumstances where health systems and resources are stretched, information that assists with targeted interventions can help with effective use of resources and that is the aim of this information.

Background: 396,900 LLINs were distributed in Dowa District in March to May and October 2015.


GiveWell's summary of AMF - in audio form


An accessible summary from GiveWell of why they recommend giving to the Against Malaria Foundation. Also a very good overview of malaria, net intervention and impact.


Remembering and honouring Dr Sylvia Meek


It is with great sadness that I share the news that Sylvia Meek passed away last week.

Sylvia's encouragement and support of AMF, right from the very start as a member of our Malaria Advisory Group and for the last 10+ years, has been important and influential. Amongst meetings and many conversations with Sylvia over the years I particularly remember one occasion when she encouraged very gently, but wonderfully insistently, that we ask someone to offer us advice saying '...and if they don't, I might just knock on their door!' She was a stalwart friend of AMF and knocked on lots of doors.

She will be very much missed by all here.

Included below is an email that is self-explanatory that I also wished to share.

Dear Friends

In case the news has not reached you, with real sadness I would like to inform you that Sylvia Meek, Technical Director of the Malaria Consortium passed away recently following an 18 month battle with cancer.

Many of us have known Sylvia for over 20 years during which time we remember her for her selfless dedication to the fight against malaria. Sylvia will be remembered in our malaria community for much more than all her technical knowledge and expertise, more than her fantastic abilities to fight on the ground, but as an exceptional human being.

However hard we try, as we continue on our journey towards a malaria free world, we will not progress unless we carry forth not only what Sylvia Meek has contributed to the science of malaria control or elimination but also what she exemplified as a person. She will continue to live amongst us for a very long time.

Wish you all good health.

Sunil

Sunil Mehra
Co-Founder and former Executive Director, Malaria Consortium

In memory of the silent and long-lasting leader in our malaria community, Sylvia Meek


Motos Against Malaria: Todd and Christina


Some years ago I had the privilege to come across two very special people, Todd Lawson and Christina Tottle. They called and said they would like to ride across Africa and deliver bednets and Motos Against Malaria was born. Over the next year ‘T&C’, as they became affectionately known to us, fundraised, rode 23,000 kms across 15 countries, delivered thousands of nets as we hooked them up with distributions with on-the-ground partners, and raised awareness about malaria and nets to thousands of people. In part this journey was in memory of Todd’s brother Sean who died of malaria so there was a very personal connection here. But T&C also wanted to help others and give back. And they did, in large numbers.

Here is a moving, entertaining, photo-stunning account of their trip.


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